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  • Late To The Party: A Rather Excellent Review For All Gods Dead

    By admin on November 1, 2012
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    We missed the rather excellent review for Marian O Neill’s All Gods Dead in The Sunday Business Post* on Sunday 21st October: It is a tale of excess, glamour and awe – completely at odds with the staid life of Twenties Ireland – which Brigit encountered in the hedonistic Paris of the ’20s and the dark, repressive Berlin of the ’30s. This

  • Nessa Cooks Up Some Spooky Foods

    By admin on October 31, 2012
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    Nessa Robins, whose first cookbook Apron Strings New Island will publish in April 2013, has some great Halloween goodies on her blog today! I rather fancy those chocolate apples myself! Chocolate Apples are a real Halloween favourite and they couldn’t be easier to make. If you want to go basic just coat an apple with melted chocolate and dip in some sprinkles or you

  • Staging ‘Ulysses': ‘What impressed me most was also what scared me most’ – The Irish Times – Sat, Oct 27, 2012

    By admin on October 27, 2012
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    The excellent Dermot Bolger has a great piece in The Irish Times today writing about adapting Ulysses for the stage: Then I realised that my terror at approaching it as a playwright reflected the terror many readers feel at approaching it as a book. Ulysses has a deserved mystique. Nobody could call it an easy read. Joyce joked about wanting

  • Covers & Stuff: The Autumn Edition

    By admin on October 25, 2012
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    Quite a number of cover reveals today, four from our Christmas list in fact and we have a few surprises held back for later this month. First off the block are the wonderful covers for the two fine new books by Dermot Bolger, a new collection of poetry, The Venice Suite and an engrossing novella, The Fall of Ireland. We

  • All Gods Dead Reviewed In Books Ireland

    By admin on October 24, 2012
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    Really great review for Marian O Neill’s novel in the current edition of Books Ireland: This is the fourth novel from Dublin-born O Neill. Like so many modern novelists she is involved in teaching creative writing. This story begins as if its another example of misery-lit as an old woman, Brigit Egan, lies dying in hospital and begins to recount